The case against exercise

February 14, 2010 at 4:24 pm 2 comments

Frank Forencich publishes another provocative essay on his Exuberant Animal website. From “Just don’t do it: The case against exercise“:

So exercise fails. Do we have a better idea?
Yes, in fact we do.
The answer is authentic, joyful, functional movement.
For those who have never seen or experienced it, authentic movement looks and feels nothing like exercise:

  • Exercise tends to be single plane; functional movement is multi-joint and multi-plane.
  • Exercise is monotonous; movement is engaging.
  • Exercise is specialized; movement is diverse.
  • Exercise is scripted; movement is authentic and intuitive.
  • Exercise is performed according to a program; movement is opportunistic.
  • Exercise feels mechanized and forced; movement feels expressive and creative.
  • Exercise is a means towards an end; movement is an end in itself.

Movement is better because it’s expansive and offers more options for physical creativity and expression. There’s more possibility and more room for the imagination. It’s more inviting, more engaging. And best of all, it’s less adversarial.

More here.

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Jason R. Atwood

I'm an avid trail runner and doctoral student at U.C. Berkeley who studies motivation and the relationship between the mind and body. This blog is a forum to share research, news, and musings about these topics of interest. More

Play is the beginning of knowledge.

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